Get Over It

Theatrical Release: March 9, 2001
Get Over It
0
1
2
3
4
5
faith
integrity
sex
language
violence
drugs
nudity
other

Synopsis

When Berke (Ben Foster) is dumped by his girlfriend Allison (Melissa Sagemiller) he turns to his friend Felix’s (Colin Hanks) sister Kelly (Kirsten Dunst) to help him win her back. But before he has the chance, Allison falls for Striker (Shane West) and Berke realizes who he truly loves.

Dove Review

THE GOOD:…I enjoyed the concept of a pseudo teen musical combining a story, a few songs (“Love Can Keep Us Together”, “What Do You Get When You Fall in Love”, “Love Matters”) and a couple of dance numbers. Vitamin C and Sisqo are in the opening and closing musical numbers that are clever and whimsical with lots of teen appeal. THE NOT-SO-GOOD:… This story has been done a dozen times but what makes this one stand out as particularly bad, is the raunchy humor. Scenes like; Berkes mom and dad (TV talk show hosts) simulating a sexual position while clothed, a dog is repeatedly shown humping different objects, Berke falls in front of a pile of horse dung and is urinated on by the animal, Electra simulates an on stage SandM act with a teen boy hanging in leather straps and then there’s Short as the cliché “gay drama teacher” who has a few funny moments but his character is too silly and mostly wasted. Foul language, a silly premise and the fact that Foster is not leading boy/man material (he’s too immature, wimpy and lacks acting ability to match with Dunst) along with numerous sexual innuendoes, abundance of bad jokes and attempts at cute teen humor that pretty much falls flat. This movie is so offensive on many levels, it’s not worth sitting through for the few really entertaining musical moments.

Content Description

Faith: None
Integrity: None
Sex: None
Language: None
Violence: None
Drugs: None
Nudity: None
Other: None

Info

Company: Miramax Pictures
Director: Tom O'Haver
Genre: Action
Runtime: 90 min.
Starring: Kirsten Dunst, Ben Foster, Sisqo, Martin Short, Carmen Electra, Swoosoe Kurtz and Ed Begley Jr.
Reviewer: Holly McClure