The Cosby Show – Box Set: Season 2

DVD Release: March 7, 2006
The Cosby Show – Box Set: Season 2
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faith
integrity
sex
language
violence
drugs
nudity
other

Synopsis

The Cosby Show appeared on NBC from 1984 to 1992, becoming one of the most popular programs in the history of television. The Cosby Show depicted a close-knit and prosperous African-American family (The Huxtables) that dwelled in New York City. Dr. Heathcliff (OB-GYN) and Clair (attorney) Huxtable were a happily married, dual-profession couple with aspirations of raising their five children in an uplifting, positive environment. The Cosby Show held TV’s #1 slot for a record five consecutive years (1985 to 1990) and stayed in the Top 20 shows for all eight seasons it was on NBC.

Dove Review

The second season of “The Cosby Show” is as funny as ever. Bill Cosby’s facial expressions say much more than anything I’ve ever heard spoken. From the comical rolling of his eyes when he is teasing to the almost stern look he gives when the kids say something outrageous, Cliff Huxtable could probably never speak and still clearly make his point. When Cliff gives his deep laugh I start holding my sides because I know the fun is about to begin. I have noticed little glitches that are probably more noticeable watching episode after episode rather than watching weekly as the show was intended. First, one episode describes the grandparents as high school sweethearts, but later states the met at a club. Also, I believe in two episodes were switched in turning the series to DVDs because episode 10 discusses in detail a date between Cliff and Claire that takes place in episode 11. Glitches aside, there are also many little threads that repeat and continue from season to season and episode to episode. The viewer learns about Claire’s tendency to put Cliff in a playful headlock when he forgets details of their past. Cliff shows Rudy a zwerbert which then continues on as Rudy’s unique way of showing affection. It’s These little touches that make family seem more real. Once again, “The Cosby Show” provides great entertainment while subtly teaching basic lessons. From breaking the mold of “women’s work” to taking schoolwork seriously, something meaningful can be taken from each episode.My favorite episode this season by far was “Theo’s Holiday.” This episode teaches a valuable lesson about living in the “real” world in such a unique way. I also though “The Dentist” was a nice episode because it was specially geared to children. Stevie Wonder fans will enjoy his guest appearance this season, and there is also a guest appearance by Olympic gold medalist runner, Valerie Briscoe-Hooks. Although the second season of “The Cosby Show” continues with the love and laughter of the first season, in the second season they also try to touch upon a couple of tough issues. Both drug and alcohol addiction and premarital sex are briefly mentioned, but these issues involve people outside the Huxtable home and are used as more of a background as to why Cliff and Claire interact with their family in a certain way. At times, the situation seemed too serious for the mood of the show, but then again it all comes down to the lesson taken. The viewer may not find deep and meaningful conversation about these hot topics, but will find the reasons parents talk to their kids about communication and self respect.

Content Description

Faith: None
Integrity: None
Sex: Husband and wife kissing; brief reference to premarital sex made by secondary character with consequences; teens kiss.
Language: Kids sing, "pull down your underpants" and get scolded.
Violence: Playful fighting; siblings fight with consequences.
Drugs: References to cigars and cigarettes; drug abuse by non-regular character discussed in negative light; husband asks wife if she's drunk as a joke knowing she hasn't been drinking.
Nudity: Man with open shirt: teenage boy with open shirt.
Other: Friendly family wagers; kids in night club setting.

Info

Company: First Look Studios
Director: Jay Sandrich
Producer: Jay Sandrich
Genre: Comedy
Runtime: 625 min.
Reviewer: Shara Witczak