Ordinary Miracles

DVD Release: January 15, 2010
Ordinary Miracles
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faith
integrity
sex
language
violence
drugs
nudity
other

Synopsis

Rewards come to those who are blessed with an open heart—a lesson learned by a young girl who dreams of a past she never had…and by a woman who yearns to make that dream come true.
Tough and unyielding, Judge Kay Woodbury (Jaclyn Smith, Charlie’s Angels) is weathering her own share of personal crises, including her ex-husband’s remarriage and a bitter impasse with her attorney father that threatens both their careers. Now, a new complication has arisen. Her name is Sally Powell (Lyndsay Fonseca, TV’s The Young and the Restless)—bright beyond her years, promising despite her insecurities, and daring someone to love her. A four-time loser when it comes to foster homes, the troubled teen faces time in the juvenile section of a women’s correctional facility. When Kay’s conscience gets the best of her, she opens the door to her own home, where Sally’s unfortunate past comes to light as well as her secrets about her late mother, who haunts her dreams; and her father, Jim (C. Thomas Howell, The Poseidon Adventure), who abandoned his daughter for desperate and selfless reasons of his own.

Ensconced in Kay’s San Diego home, Sally finds a promising new life, however tenuous. Kay, too, has discovered the courage to face her own personal problems and newfound sense of identity by sharing time, dreams, and disappointments with her young friend. When her emotional involvement in Sally’s life increases, Kay decides to challenge the sensible judgments that have defined her career and take a heartrending chance. Locating Sally’s father, Kay hires him as a landscaper. Unaware of their blood ties, Jim and Sally find a natural kinship, but as the relationship between the three deepens, so does Kay’s apprehension about revealing the truth. When she does, it will change their lives in ways no one imagined and open Kay’s eyes and heart to a miracle that only one young girl believed was possible.

A life-affirming film of family and forgiveness, “Ordinary Miracles” is for anyone who has learned how to survive the mistakes and appreciate the miracles of being alive.

Dove Review

“There are consequences for your actions,” says Judge Kay Woodbury (Jaclyn Smith) to Sally Ann Powell, whom she has taken in. Sally is a rebellious teen girl who was given up by her foster parents because they no longer know how to deal with her.

The judge begins to connect with her a bit at a time but Sally still makes mistakes, like stealing some of the judge’s jewell’s to give her boyfriend who sells the stuff at a pawn shop. Sally also drinks some champagne but pays the price for it and offers her apologies to Kay. The judge sees the potential in Sally, who enjoys reading “David Copperfield”.

This is a warm and touching story which nicely has no strong language. With themes of forgiveness, letting go of the past and making a fresh start, it definitely has something to say and does it nicely in this movie. We gladly award this film our Dove “Family-Approved” Seal for ages twelve plus.

Content Description

Faith: None
Integrity: None
Sex: Kissing between a girl and her boyfriend.
Language: G/OMG-3; Good Lord-1
Violence: A young man uses a gun to hold up a pawn shop and races in his car afterward to get away; store keeper runs out of store with gun but doesn't use it.
Drugs: An underage girl sneaks some champagne and drinks it but later gets sick and apologizes for her behavior; a comment about cigarettes and a young man tells a girl, "Your group likes to smoke pipes"; champagne served at party; wine is consumed.
Nudity: Cleavage.
Other: A character has a heart attack in the story but survives it; the topic of forgiveness is explored in the story; a teen girl learns her father is alive and he learns the girl he met is his daughter; a "dead" mother appears to her daughter to encourage her and it is not clear whether it is simply in the girl's imagination or is supposed to be a ghost.

Info

Company: Echo Bridge Home Entertainment
Director: Michael Switzer
Genre: Drama
Runtime: 85 min.
Reviewer: Edwin L. Carpenter